Shroud of turin carbon 14 dating

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Research in the 1980s suggests the image was "forged" on the cloth between 12, , the BBC reports.

Since the shroud and "all its facets" still cannot be replicated using today's top-notch technology, researchers suggest it is impossible that the original image could have been created in either period.

It also listed the findings of an international group of 24 scientists that the Shroud of Turin was surviving evidence of the crucified Christ and an experts assertion that the material, weave and style of the shroud were from the Dead Sea area, dating from the first century AD" (Brendan Whitings "The Shroud Story" rebuts scientific carbon dating tests while presenting readers with supported insight into the most recent compelling explanations.

Brendan presents scientific evidence in laymans terms the fabric edges appear to have been mended in medieval times via a meticulous re-weaving process.

The machine used to examine the Shroud's fibres and test traction, allowed researchers to examine tiny fibres alongside about twenty samples of cloth dated between 3000 BC and 2000 AD.

"Final results show that the Shroud fibres examined produced the following dates, all of which are 95% certain and centuries away from the medieval dating obtained with Carbon-14 testing in 1988: the dates given to the Shroud after FT-IR testing, is 300 BC 400, 200 BC 500 after Raman testing and 400 AD 400 after multi-parametric mechanical testing.

Decades of research on Jesus' proposed burial cloth have revealed an array of conflicting ideas surrounding the shroud's authenticity.

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Many Christians are grateful to Whiting for first knowledge of the recent refuted dating challenge, as well as his gifted ability to describe the sequences of events in an unambiguous manner. Catholic Weekly reported on January 11, 2009: "The author of one of the most influential books on the Shroud of Turin, Brendan Whiting, has died in Sydney, aged 73.

However, scientists are willing to point out the flaw in their findings.

The conferences (including the International Symposium in Dallas in 2005) and wrote on the breakthrough results.

ENEA (National Agency for New Technology, Energies and Sustainable Economic Development) published a report after 5 years of research conducted on the Shroud, in which it was determined that the wattage of UV radiation required to produce the image cannot be reproduce by even today's technology.

The Shroud of Turin is much older than suggested by radiocarbon dating carried out in the 1980s, according to a new study in a peer-reviewed journal.

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